Whitney Lynn: Rummage

Rummage | Press Release | Wong Kit Yi | Kai Vierstra | SeoKyeong Lee Yoon | Christine Wong Yap and Lauren Frances Adams

June 6 – June 29, 2015
Opening Reception: June 6, 7-9 pm

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Whitney Lynn presents Rummage, a series of performative installations at Open Source Gallery.

Garage sales have a long history, tracing back to the early 1800s, when shipyards would sell off unclaimed cargo–called “rommage”–at discounted rates. Eventually moving from the docks into private yards and community spaces, the modern garage sale exploded as both a tradition and phenomenon in the 1950s with the flood of consumer goods entering the market. Today rummage sales are a staple of summer and many shoppers are driven by “the find,” combing through others’ castoffs in an effort to discover a coveted treasure.

Throughout the month of June, each week of Rummage will feature a rotating artist’s interpretation of a garage sale. Lynn has invited an array of New York-based artists with conceptually-oriented practices to participate, including Wong Kit Yi, Kai Vierstra, SeoKyeong Lee Yoon, Christine Wong Yap, and Lauren Frances Adams. Welcoming each collaborator to freely interpret the premise, responses variously examine themes of sales, investment, value, marketplace, unwanted materials, and community engagement. Installations will range from collections of transformed toys to participatory artworks.

Rummage is an extension of Lynn’s previous performance-based projects, exploring aspects of vernacular cultures and casting others to investigate the messy intersections of art and life. She is interested in the places where boundaries, environments, and actions collide. Playing with performance and public space, Rummage will create a series of participatory experiences that highlight the history inherent within commonplace objects and often overlooked traditions.

Whitney Lynn implements a variety of media–including sculpture, performance, video, and drawing–to question ideas of boundaries and containment, history and restaging, context, and form. Lynn received her BFA in Sculpture + Extended Media from Virginia Commonwealth University and her MFA in New Genres from the San Francisco Art Institute. She is currently a member of the Stanford University faculty.

Schedule:

June 6, 7-9pm: Wong Kit Yi, Forbidden Flickers/no-no films
June 11-13, 2-7pm: Kai Vierstra, Airavata’s Honesty Boxed Bazaar
June 18-20, 2-7pm: SeoKyeong Lee Yoon, Used Toys for Sale
June 25-26, 3-8pm and June 27, 1-6pm: Christine Wong Yap and Lauren Frances Adams, a handle, a stem, a hook, a ring, a loop



Yun-Woo Choi: Endless, Seamless

Endless, Seamless | Installation View | Press Release | Livestream | On Brooklynhits.com | On Long Island for Sale | On Disinfo

May 2 – May 31, 2015
Opening Reception: May 2, 7-9 pm

Yun-Woo Choi, From the Beginning, 2011

From the Beginning, 2011, Magazines, spray paint, resin, stainless wire

Yun-Woo Choi presents “Endless, Seamless,” an installation for Open Source Gallery.

Given the ubiquity of printed matter in daily life, it is no wonder that people often become more concerned with the representation of a thing than the thing itself. In pop culture, print and images in the pages of magazines and newspapers illustrate our world through depictions of cars, celebrities, and lifestyles. In religion, many believe that the Holy Bible, Koran, and Buddhist scripts exist as sacred objects. Yet, constructed out of symbolic language, all of these texts and images only function as a kind of map, a tangible object that points to an existence outside of our four-dimensional perception. According to philosopher William James, there are two ways of knowing things: immediately and intuitively or conceptually and representatively. By folding, tearing, and combining, Yun-Woo Choi obfuscates the meanings constructed in two-dimensional printed material in an attempt to deliver intuitive feelings to the viewer.

Philosopher Ken Wilber posits that thought and text represent a process of compressing three-dimensional reality into a two-dimensional illusion of the real world. Objectivity becomes an impossibility if one’s own thoughts always translate the world into subjective representation. In theoretical physics, scientists discuss theories involving eleven space-time dimensions that cannot be perceived, yet exist all around us. Within these dimensions, there would exist a multitude of ways to perceive and exist in the world. Choi takes these theories into consideration to speculate about the possibility for one to exist in multiple realities where invisible and untouchable subjective concepts such as emotions may manifest physically, supported by different laws of physics.

“Endless, Seamless” presents an intensely physical, yet fragmented and ethereal experience that allows for dualities to coalesce. Choi explores the relationship between the banal and profound, allowing seemingly opposite concepts to fragment and become intertwined as he constructs a subjective and ever-changing experience for the viewer. Encountering the philosophical and theoretical simultaneously within his elegant sculptures, one can begin to comprehend the numerous hidden and overlapping dimensions in reality.

Yun-Woo Choi is a Brooklyn-based artist who was born in Seoul, Korea. He received a BFA and MFA in sculpture from Hong-Ik University, and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts. Choi was a recipient of the Jung-Ang Fine Art Prize in 2007 and participated in the Anderson Ranch Art Center residency program in Aspen in 2010. He recently won the award of Year in Review in the Sculpture and Installation category from See Me in 2014. His works have been featured in the Chungju International Craft Biennial, Busan International Biennial, as well as several group shows in Seoul, Los Angeles, and New York.



Jasmine Murrell: Some Impossibility Without A Name

Some Impossibility Without A Name | Press Release | Installation View

April 4 – April 26, 2015
Opening Reception: April 4, 7-9 pm
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Jasmine Murrell presents “Some Impossibility Without A Name,” an installation for Open Source Gallery.

How can we begin again at the end? Where is the beginning of nothingness? Where is the end of our illusions dressed as mass media and 24-hour TV? How bad did it hurt before — or are we just moving in waves? “Some Impossibility Without A Name” is inspired by the undercurrent that holds us all, the substance older than thought, the elements we are made of and will eventually return to.

Murrell manipulates and transforms iconic materials to create alternate forms, constructing new objects, spaces, and realities that reflect our phenomenal way of life. She reframes historic associations that we may have with materials and objects to revisit the past while re-inventing the present. Murrell’s work reminds us of the events and history behind us, as well as the unknowable future that lies ahead. Humanity is constantly shifting and transforming – creating, remembering, forgetting. While it is easily obscured by the commotion of our daily lives, we are all a part of a much larger narrative than what we can see, connected throughout space and time. “Some Impossibility Without a Name” discovers the indefinable, yet palpable, ways in which trauma manifests and dissolves itself in our memories and histories.

Jasmine Murrell is a New York-based interdisciplinary artist. She received her BFA from the Parsons School of Design and her MFA from Hunter College. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally over the past decade in exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, Bronx Museum of the Arts, African-American Museum of Art, Art Basel, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit. Jasmine’s work has also been published in the New York Times, Amsterdam News, NY1 News, and the Detroit News. She is also a member of the artist collective HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, which will be exhibiting at the Rotterdam Museum this spring.



Tirtzah Bassel: I Want To Hold You Close

I Want To Hold You Close | Press Release | Installation View

March 7 – March 30, 2015
Opening Reception: March 7, 7-9pm

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Tirtzah Bassel presents “I Want to Hold You Close,” an installation for Open Source Gallery.

In a culture where we are increasingly watching and being watched, Bassel is interested in how we perform. Using the rapt audience of a TED Talk as subject, “I Want to Hold You Close” is an immersive installation centered on a large-scale oil painting of a crowd, effectively placing the viewer on stage. As the viewer confronts the specificity and humanity of each individual’s existence within the audience, unique identities begin to stand out against the crowd.

Bassel explores the tension between anonymity and individuality, highlighting the desire for closeness and recognition that often drives our performances in real and virtual encounters. Inspired by work such as Marlene Dumas’ “Chlorosis” and the Terracotta Warriors of Xi’an, China, Bassel uses the traditional genre of portraiture in conjunction with the obscurity of a crowd to allow a sense of intimacy to unfold, even within the monumental scale of her painting. Her expressive brush strokes and vivid colors bring attention to subtle details of expression and body language. The all-encompassing installation is an invitation to slow down and spend a contemplative moment in the space.

Tirtzah Bassel is an Israeli artist based in New York. Her drawings, paintings, and site-responsive duct tape installations explore the permeable borders separating public and private domains, specifically in airport security zones, border crossings, and public transportation. Tirtzah has exhibited her work nationally and internationally with recent installations created on site in Harlem, New York, and El Paso, Texas. Tirtzah studied drawing and painting at the Jerusalem Studio School in Israel and she earned her MFA from Boston University. She is assistant director of the Brandeis Institute of Music and Art and is the recipient of the 2011-2012 LABA Artist Fellowship. Her work has been reviewed in Hyperallergic, Huffington Post, Arts in Bushwick, The Forward, and The Boston Globe. Tirtzah is represented by Slag Gallery in New York and is a studio artist in the Chashama Workspace Program in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.



B. David Walsh: Extracted Bedroom Project

Extracted Bedroom Project | Press Release | Installation View | Livestream | In the Brooklyn Paper | On Brooklynhits.com | On Time Out New York

February 7-March 1, 2015
Opening Reception: February 7, 7-9pm

Extracted Bedroom Dark B&W

B. David Walsh presents “Extracted Bedroom Project,” an installation and performance for Open Source.

Today, we are inundated with others’ lives – we see their accomplishments and struggles on social media and watch events from across the globe on the news. Internet-based exhibitionism has become a part of our daily routines, from the most exciting moments to the most mundane. Documentation of these events is not just a product of how we live our lives, but also helps to create and alter our behavior, often making it into a performance for an online audience. In “Extracted Bedroom Project,” B. David Walsh is displaced so that we can examine his lifestyle, habits, and day-to-day activities both online and in person.

In Walsh’s bedroom, his personal and creative life intermingle, his paintings hang on the walls next to the items he uses every day and the bed where he sleeps. In “Extracted Bedroom Project,” Walsh will re-create his bedroom at Open Source, installing walls, windows, and doorways, as well as relocate all of his belongings to his new room within the gallery walls. His own personal gallery from his bedroom will be recreated at Open Source with his artwork displayed alongside his more private, personal belongings.

Walsh describes the project as “an exhibit within an exhibit within a performance-piece.” The exhibit explores how disruptions of comfort and privacy can effect one’s daily life. While all of his possessions reside in the gallery, Walsh will continue to live in his own bedroom. Walsh’s time spent living in his empty room will be broadcast online, so that the viewer will not only be able to examine the artist’s bedroom, but will have 24/7 access to his life through a computer screen. Left without any items of comfort, Walsh’s daily routine will be disrupted and his comfort replaced with constant reminder that his every action has become a performance for an audience.

B. David Walsh is a Brooklyn-based artist who was born in Clinton, Massachusetts. He has exhibited in New York at the Greenpoint Gallery (Brooklyn) and the Limner Gallery (Hudson). This is his first solo exhibit.



Lena Lapschina: Yes/No

Yes/No | Press Release | Installation View | Resume | On Brooklynhits.com

January 10 – February 4, 2015
Opening Reception: January 10, 7-9pm

Lapschina_YES_NO

Lena Lapschina presents “Yes/No,” an installation for Open Source Gallery.

In Lapschina’s work, communication is key. Lapschina is well-known for her systematic and methodical investigation into social issues through the exploration of malfunctions and opposing factors. She explores not only the outcomes of choices, but what opportunities are being missed by having to choose. “Yes/No” is a spatial installation of two light objects produced from sixteen standard fluorescent tubes. Illuminated against a stark background, two choices are clear with little in between but a limbo: “Yes” and “No.”

Visitors are welcomed into a space where they may move freely between dualities without reaching a decision. However, while the viewer is free to choose, one may not have the choices of “Yes” and “No” simultaneously. On one side there is the affirmative of “Yes,” but by simply turning around, it now becomes “No.” In “Yes/No,” opposing ideas do not clash, but still remain on opposite sides of the coin.

Lena Lapschina (Austrian, born Russian) graduated from State Stroganow University of Fine and Applied Arts in Moscow. She lives and works in Vienna and Lower Austria. She won the Austrian State Grant for Video and Media Art in 2011.



Soup Kitchen 2014

Soup Kitchen | 2014 Open Source Picks | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013

The 7th Annual Open Source Soup Kitchen will commence this December 1st at Open Source Gallery.

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We are seeking artists, cooks, friends, and neighbors to join us for a month of cooking, eating, sharing, and celebrating. For as many nights of the month as we have volunteers, we will provide the cookware and utensils and the volunteer chef will be responsible for the “one-pot meal” of the night. We welcome all kinds of unique dishes from any ethnic tradition. Volunteers should cook a meal for approximately 15-20 people, which will be served between 7:00 and 9:00pm. Usually dishes are a “one-pot meal,” a soup or stew.

Those who are interested should sign up to reserve a night or to receive more information.

The cook of the night is also responsible for providing an artistic element to incorporate into the evening. In the past, participants have displayed photographs on the walls, transformed the space into a winter-wonderland, read monologues, or played music. Those who attend the soup kitchen vary from neighbors to artists to others who are down on their luck or simply hungry. Not a traditional soup kitchen, this event focuses on conversation, community, and art.

Sometimes the conversation flows easily, and sometimes not, but the food is nearly always tasty (it’s New York, after all – we have standards!). So join us for good food, good art, and good conversation and bring all your friends and neighbors!

See full calendar here



Sofia Szamosi: Eat Me

November 8 – December 1, 2014
Opening Reception: November 8, 7-9pm

Press Release

3sofia_szamosi_sprinkles

Open Source Gallery presents “Eat Me,” new multimedia work by Sofia Szamosi.

The Open Source Gallery is proud to present “Eat me,” the first solo show of New York based artist, Sofia Szamosi. Curated by Keith Miller, Sofia Szamosi’s “Eat Me” explores the relationship between the artist’s sense of self, food and contemporary notions of body image through a series of video self-portraits. Through exquisitely shot, confrontational images, Szamosi work addresses the complexities of body image and food, illustrated through sensual, grotesque, and occasionally disturbing imagery. Reminiscent of advertisements of overtly sexualized women selling the newest commodities, guilty pleasures, and unhealthy sweets, the artist looks directly into the camera, confronting the viewer. With her own body as a canvas, Szamosi explores consumption and desire, making herself both target and victimizer of the almost inescapable excess in our consumer-based society.

“Eat Me” presents a tenuous balance of an enticing eroticism and a troubling repulsion. The viewer ends up involved in Szamosi’s contemplation of food and complicit in her predicaments, which range from enjoyment to humiliation. She spits multi-colored candies like a fountain or seductively licks a lollypop; she drowns in syrup and coughs up sprinkles. In each case, the viewer must decide where to draw the line:where does indulgence end and obsession begin? Szamosi’s work lays bare the conflicted relationship we have with pleasure, the body, and what we mean by free will. Alternately sexy and sickening, “Eat Me” walks the delicate line between solipsistic desire and self-destruction.

Sofia Szamosi lives and works in New York, New York. Sofia’s music videos have been released by labels Sweat It Out and Dim Mak, and her photobooth photography has been featured in Russh Magazine and the Gallatin Review. Her artwork has been represented in the Gallatin Arts Festival, Superchief Gallery, and at the International Photobooth Convention in Chicago.

Keith Miller is a filmmaker, painter, and curator. Miller is currently a professor at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. Since 2009, he has been the curator of the Gallatin Galleries, encouraging work that engages the personal with the political. Miller’s exhibition of paintings, “Trees,” was shown at Open Source in 2013. He recently premiered his second feature film, Five Star, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and the Venice Film Festival’s Giornate degli Auotre. His first feature length film, Welcome to Pine Hill, which The NY Times’ AO Scott called “resonant and powerful,” premiered in 2012 at the Slamdance Film Festival, where it won the Grand Jury Prize.



Corina Reynolds: Northwestern Expansion

Northwestern Expansion | Press Release | Hyperallergic Review

October 11 – November 1, 2014
Opening Reception: October 11, 7-9pm

Northwestern_Expansion_corina_reynolds

Corina Reynolds presents “Northwestern Expansion,” an installation for Open Source Gallery.

When explorers in the 1400’s patiently waited through harsh winters with their ships sometimes frozen in place during their search for the Northwest Passage, they were making progress while waiting. The occupants of a waiting room are not explorers, per say, but they are making progress towards a goal while in a state of pause—every second they get closer to their destination.

“Northwestern Expansion” is an immersive installation examining the act of waiting in pursuit of one’s goals. Reynolds recreates a waiting room and executive office from the Northwestern section of the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building in Manhattan, which is home to the Social Security Administration, New York City Immigration, and many other government offices. In her installation, Open Source’s main gallery becomes a container that holds a “core sample” of the Javits building’s 31st floor. Reynolds uses the search for the Northwest Passage, a northern trade route from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, as well as traditional waiting rooms as a metaphor for the waiting we do daily. These acts of waiting in office buildings, like the icy search for the Northwest Passage, are motivated by money, prestige, and exchange. Through carefully controlled light, surface, space, and typical waiting room furnishings such as vinyl flooring, industrial carpeting, service counters, and office chairs, Reynolds puts the viewer in intermission, evoking the experience of waiting and allowing individuals to examine their own ambitions.

Corina Reynolds is an artist who works with installation, video, and performance. Her immersive works invite the viewer to experience the hierarchies present every day in society. She earned her BFA from San Diego State University her MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of Art and in 2012 co-founded Small Editions, an artist book studio and press in Brooklyn. In 2011, Reynolds was an artist-in-residence at the Wassaic Project in New York. From 2011-2013, she taught courses in bookbinding and artist book publication at the Interlochen Center for the Arts. Reynolds has exhibited across the U.S. in New York, Michigan, Iowa, and California.



Emanuele Cacciatore: A Conversation with Consequence

A Conversation with Consequence | Images | Press Release

September 13 – October 4, 2014
Opening Reception: September 13, 7-9pm
Closing Party: Friday, October 3, 7−9pm

Ruddy-Trees-and-Buried-Hatchets-(GOOD)
“Ruddy Trees and Buried Hatchets,” 2014, Oil on canvas, 76” x 76”

Emanuele Cacciatore presents “A Conversation with Consequence,” an exhibition of paintings for Open Source Gallery.

Without relying solely on conventional aesthetics or contemporary ideology, Cacciatore addresses how we perceive and define gestural painting. The gestural passages in his artwork, although realized through accidental, intentional, and mechanical manipulation of the material, ultimately reflect a genuine and thorough investigation of painterly content. Cacciatore uses brushes and stencils in conjunction with an array of industrial tools and various painting techniques, creating both a concrete and ephemeral reorganization of form and space.

“A Conversation with Consequence” showcases a series of oil and acrylic paintings that represent a dialogue with man-made disasters. From the food and water we consume to the raw materials we use and the inspiration we draw from our surroundings, our success and survival as a species rely heavily on our relationship with the earth. Unfortunately, our technological advancements often come at the expense of our planet. Whether caused by greed, negligence, or human error, the results of man-made disasters can be devastating, often claiming numerous lives and irreparably damaging the environment. Using maps and imagery of disaster sites from around the world, Cacciatore recontextualizes these destructive events, creating a new perspective and reclaiming them as abstract works of art.

Emanuele Cacciatore earned his BFA from the State University of New York at Buffalo and his MFA in painting from the University of California. He has shown in numerous group and solo exhibits in New York, New Jersey, Florida, and California, including the Pamela Auchincloss Gallery, Art Now: Art Basel in Miami, The Montclair Art Museum, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, and Cooper Union in New York City. Cacciatore’s work has also been reviewed by publications such as ARTnews and the Santa Barbara Independent.



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on view now

Sara Morawetz: How the Stars Stand

How the Stars Stand | Installation View | Project Website | Livestream | Press Release July 15 – August 22, 2015 Closing Reception: August 22, 7-9pm “Where is the clock to show us how the stars stand?” – RAY BRADBURY Our experience of time is not constant, rather, it flexes and yields to the specific […]

upcoming

Soap Box Derby 2015
Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu: TBA
Savas Boyraz: Invisible Landscapes
Mira Gaberova: TBA

past

Whitney Lynn: Rummage
Yun-Woo Choi: Endless, Seamless
Jasmine Murrell: Some Impossibility Without A Name
Tirtzah Bassel: I Want To Hold You Close
B. David Walsh: Extracted Bedroom Project
Lena Lapschina: Yes/No
Soup Kitchen 2014
Sofia Szamosi: Eat Me
Corina Reynolds: Northwestern Expansion
Emanuele Cacciatore: A Conversation with Consequence
Soap Box Workshops and Derby 2014
Mark Stilwell: The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beast (The Power of the Constructonauts)
Hubert Dobler: Roundabout
Arne Schreiber: Your Stripes
Katerina Marcelja: Fragment Series
Fuse-Works: Some Assembly Required
Anja Matthes: Out-Sight-In In-Sight-Out
Soup Kitchen 2013
Katarina Poliacikova: Until We Remember The Same
Miho Suzuki: Our Children Today
We Know Not Exactly Where or How
Soap Box Derby 2013
Keith Miller: Trees
Andrea Ray: Utopians Dance
Margrethe Aanestad: Herein
David D’Ostilio: The Chopping Block
Stefanie Koseff: To The Deep
Michael Poetschko: Zona
Soup Kitchen 2012
Kathleen Vance: From the Woods
Nick Kline: Gilgo Beach
Soap Box Camp and Derby 2012
Patrick Cadenhead: Spring and Renewal
Felipe Mujica: One day this will NOT be yours
BETWEEN MOUNTAIN
Between Mountain – part 2
Peter Feigenbaum
The Meeting
Karl Spörk, Another Meeting
Leigh Davis: The Burrow (H.H.)