/rive: Anamorphosis

Anamorphosis | Convergence Lines | Press Release | Artist Website | On Park Slope Stoop | Facebook Event

January 9-30, 2016
Opening Reception: January 9, 7-9pm

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/rive collective presents Anamorphosis, an installation for Open Source Gallery.

Anamorphosis is a spatial and relational exploration of what makes and defines a neighborhood, set in, and inspired by, the area surrounding the Open Source Gallery. The exhibit’s video and photo installations seek to collectively make visible the physical and social lines that demarcate and connect a community. Through site-specific and mobile media projects that encourage residents to reflect upon their neighborhood and share their stories, /rive seeks to highlight the relationships between public space, mobile technology and local or microhistories.

In Horizon Lines, Annie Berman and Samara Smith uncover the edges that mark the neighborhood’s undefined and immutable borders. By visually exploring lines of demarcation, Berman and Smith investigate the areas where neighborhood life meets neighborhood boundaries. In Convergence Lines, Samara Smith and A.E. Souzis outline the area’s social connections by mapping photographs sourced from the neighborhood’s residents. Visitors to the exhibit and residents will be invited to submit photographs via text throughout the month of January. When the images are collected and exhibited, they will create a more complete portrait of the surrounding communities, offering a glimpse into the many individual narratives that exist within the neighborhood.

/rive is a Brooklyn-based artist collective focused on site-specific, locative projects that meet at the intersection of psychogeography, locative media and documentary narrative. Most projects are set in, and explore, urban public spaces. Inspired by social practice, /rive embraces collaborative and participatory methodologies, blurring the boundaries between maker, subject and audience. Members Annie Berman, Samara Smith and A.E. Souzis have exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, Queens Museum, Anthology Film Archives, New York Film Festival, Hammer Museum, Art in Odd Places and beyond.



Soup Kitchen 2015

SIGN UP! | English | Español | 中国 | 2015 Schedule | On DNAinfo | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014

December 1-31, 2015
7:00-9:00pm

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Each year the Open Source Soup Kitchen brings together artists, cooks, friends, and neighbors for a month of cooking, eating, sharing and celebrating!

For as many nights of the month as we have volunteers, we will provide the cookware and utensils–and our volunteer chef of the evening will be responsible to a “one-pot meal” (usually a soup or stew) that can feed approximately 15-20 people. All meals are served between 7:00-9:00pm. We welcome all kinds of unique dishes from any ethnic tradition!

The cook of the night is also responsible for incorporating an artistic element into the evening–it can be a one-night exhibit, musical performance, short play, or decoration of the gallery!

Attendees of the Soup Kitchen are neighbors, artists, people who are down on their luck, or some who are simply hungry. Sometimes the conversation flows easily, sometimes not, but the food is nearly always tasty (it’s New York, after all–we have standards!)

Join us for good food, good art, and good conversation–and bring your friends, family, and neighbors!

If you would like to host an evening, sign up here: http://bit.do/soupkit15

This is a free event. If you would like to be a guest, stop by Open Source any night in December between 7:00pm and 9:00pm!



Mira Gaberova: Statue of Everything

We will not be open on Thanksgiving and will reopen on Friday, November 27th.

Statue of Everything | Installation View | Press Release | Artist Website | Facebook Event

November 7 – November 30, 2015
Opening Reception: November 7, 7-9 pm

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Mira Gaberova presents Statue of Everything, a multimedia installation at Open Source Gallery.

A stage curtain is a peculiar form of a barrier. It is the barrier between our ordinary and mundane world and an anticipated event of the virtual world of theatre. At the same time it divides the space with a passive position of the viewer from the space of the stage where the artistic process takes place. The curtain conceals, divides and determines the space. In many instances we perceive it as a two-dimensional blind that obstructs vision, not different from a sleepy screen of a computer or closed eyes.

Contemporary artists, just like their performative activities, often oscillate on the borderline between the mundane world around them and an artificially determined field of creative process. One of many possible ways how to define this is to use a medium of video. Mira Gáberová uses video especially in this sense. In many of her works, like in the presented one, the video frame reflects the space of artist`s passive presence confronted with a given environment, rather than a theatre stage for an active performance.

Here an analogy between the theatre space and artist`s activities is fully expressed by the author. The particular videos capture the artists performing on the proscenium of various theatres. She stands exactly on the imaginary borderline where the stage curtain opens or closes or is lowered and raised. The artist is in a literal physical contact with the curtain in these situations. A minimalist straightforwardness of the performance itself is contrasted by pathos of theatre environment. Mira Gáberová might at first glance present her body as an object, but standing on the borderline of the stage and auditorium proves how important the value of own experience is to her.

The stage curtain is a three-dimensional actor as well as a spatial object. Simultaneously, it serves as a metaphor for a relationship between an artist and reality, where the intersection between the ordinary and the imagination becomes the matter of physicality.

Mira Gaberova (born 1979 in Lučenec, Slovakia ) lives and works in Prague, Czech Republic. She obtained her BFA from the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Bratislava and her MFA from the University of Newcastle. She has had residencies at the Museum Quartier, Donumenta Regensburg, and the ISCP. Gaberova has exhibited at the Pradelna Bohnice (Czech Republic), Umelka Gallery (Slovakia), Approach Art Association (Hungary), and Oi Futuro (Brazil) among others.

Text by Viktor Čech. Čech is a curator, art historian, and professor at Charles University in Prague.

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Savas Boyraz: Back Drop

Back Drop | Installation View | Interview in South Slope News | In Musee Magazine | Press Release

October 3 – November 1, 2015
Opening Reception: October 3, 7-9 pm

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Savas Boyraz presents Back Drop, a video installation for Open Source Gallery.

In Back Drop, Kurdish artist Savas Boyraz explores the stories of individual Kurdish guerilla fighters using portraiture. Having seen people in his life join the fight, Boyraz views his work as a sort of “image-based activism” that he uses to explore the struggle of the Kurdish community in the Middle East, as well as his own roots. Focusing on individuals, Back Drop puts a face to a complex political struggle, exploring a culture that struggles for its rights. Faced with the realities of war and an uncertain future, what are the responsibilities of individuals to their communities, their heritage, and their beliefs?

Kurdistan–an area that is not a country, but an area spread across Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria–is inhabited by the Kurds, a group considered to be the largest ethnic community without its own country. For decades, resistance groups have fought for a homeland for the Kurdish people in a continuously tumultuous region. With no national boundaries, identities are formed through self determination–and political rights in autonomous Kurdish communities are only obtained through the resistance of the people.

In a triptych, created in collaboration with Swedish artist Martin Nordström, stories of two individuals are told: one who is preparing to leave to join the guerilla struggle against Daesh (ISIS) and one who has returned from the fight. Each individual is situated in front of a backdrop, a prop once used by guerrilla theatre troupes. Set against varied landscapes, the borders of the backdrop provide an oddly precise framing for the portraits. The three stories in triptych format recall religious artwork and encourage the viewer to reflect upon not only the stories being told, but their role in the personal struggles of others. The work not only captures war from the perspective of those fighting it, but explores internal struggles and Boyraz’s relationship with the subjects. The future, present, and past of the Kurdish guerilla struggle is presented, uniting the stories of individuals with one, common backdrop.

Savas Boyraz was born in Istanbul, Turkey. He obtained his BFA in photography from the Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University and his MFA from the Art in the Public Realm program in Konstfack, University College of Arts, Crafts and Design. Boyraz has received awards from the Hasselblad Foundation, the Swedish Arts Grants Committee, and the HSBC Photography Award. He has participated in exhibitions in the Duhok International Film Festival (Iraq), Amed Art Gallery (Turkey), Berlin Kurdish Film Festival (German), Teatro di Nascosto (Italy), Aperture Foundation (US), Les Rencontres d’Arles (France), and Michaelis Galleries (South Africa) among others.



Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu: Venus von Hamburg

Venus von Hamburg | Installation View | Studio Images | Press Release | In IN New York Magazine

September 3 – September 28, 2015
Opening Reception: September 12, 7-9 pm

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Bors & Ritiu is an artist duo that delights in using methods of appropriation and overidentification, criticizing the art market with a whiff of humour and wit that goes well beyond a postmodern sense of irony. In this sense, their work comes close to an artistic form of activism, a kind of avant-garde in disguise, refusing to communicate a straightforward, overtly political message. (There is no programme). As visual artists, they are implying themselves in their own critique, as if they were characters in their own story. (Do you read me?) Bors & Ritiu use their twin personality and accompanying avatars as a means to install an ambiguity, bending an appropriated imagery back on itself, short-circuiting it in a way. (A strange loop). This is how they typically tend to frustrate the viewers’ desire, projecting their expectations back onto them like a boomerang. — Pieter Vermeulen, September 2013

Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu present Venus von Hamburg, an installation at Open Source Gallery that explores politics, heritage, and the economy.

While wars in the past have been fought with weapons, it has been said that WWIII will be fought with the banking system.If this is true, we are at a turning point that could see politics allow for the colonization of nations by those who hold them in debt. Venus von Hamburg represents an immediate response to financial crises and inequalities that are reaching a breaking point in Europe and have prompted grassroots movements within the United States and Europe. Within Venus von Hamburg, the great Greek beauty Venus de Milo is distorted and disfigured. Her fate is no longer controlled by her people, but her uncertain future has been dictated by politicians and executives.

Venus von Hamburg highlights the often overlooked humor and aesthetics within contemporary issues, conveying a politically-charged, yet ultimately objective image. Their goal is to present dichotomies–good/bad, moral/immoral, legal/illegal–allowing the audience to steer their own observations and conversations. Within their sculptural collage, Bors & Ritiu not only appropriate an historical image, but also rework one from a prior project of theirs, playing with how images can be used and re-used within ever-changing and ambiguous contexts. Exploring their own Romanian heritage and its relationship to the European Union, Venus von Hamburg represents an immediate response to crises within the financial system.

Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu are a Belgium-based artist duo originally from Romania. They have exhibited extensively in Belgium at venues such as the Galerie Marion De Cannière, Verbeke Foundation and the Middelheim Museum. Bors & Ritiu have also participated in the Art Brussels Art Fair, Slick Art Fair, cutlog Art Fair, Trajector Art Fair, and the BORG Biennial. In 2011, they received the ARTE/cutlog Prize at the cutlog Art Fair in Paris. This is their first solo exhibition in the United States.



Soap Box Derby 2015

Meet the Judges | In the New York Times | On Brooklyn Independent Television | 2015 Derby | 2014 Derby | 2013 Derby | 2012 Derby

Saturday, August 29, 2015
Derby begins at noon

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Join us for the 8th annual Open Source Soap Box Derby!

Experience the thrill of witnessing our participants from the summer Soap Box Workshop race their fun, funky, eco-friendly contraptions down 17th Street in Brooklyn.

Since 2008, our Soap Box Derby has been a staple of the neighborhood. Each year, the Soap Box Workshop encouraging children to think outside the box. Children plan their inventions using sketches and calculations, bringing them to life with found and recycled objects as well as building materials. Over the course of the workshop, participants turn piles of seemingly useless trash into functional machines while learning about construction and design and, more importantly, having fun. Leading up to the derby, kids test drive their racers, ensuring the safety and functionality of each invention. At the Soap Box Derby, participants get to race their soap box cars for real as friends, families, and neighbors cheer them on as they race down the street.

This year’s judges panel will include Oriana Leckert (Brooklyn Spaces), Peira Moinester (Brooklyn Music Factory), and Bill Oberkehr (Solarize Brooklyn CB6)

The Soap Box Derby has received rave reviews over the past 5 years from publications such as the New York Times, Brooklyn Paper, New York Daily News, DNAinfo and many more!



Sara Morawetz: How the Stars Stand

How the Stars Stand | Installation View | Project Website | Livestream | In Symbiartic | Interview with Hodinkee | On Upworthy | On Extraordinary Routines | Press Release

July 15 – August 22, 2015
Closing Reception: August 22, 6-9pm
The closing reception will feature a talk by Dr. Michael Allison at 6pm

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“Where is the clock to show us how the stars stand?”
– RAY BRADBURY

Our experience of time is not constant, rather, it flexes and yields to the specific nature of our passage through space. Bound to Earth, this concept seems imperceptible, for we know no time but our own. Yet as we chart our passage around the sun, revolving on our own familial axis, time operates differently elsewhere. Compelled by operations outside our experience, each planetary body moves in its own discrete cycles, heeding standards that are as foreign as they appear desultory. From Earth, such notions hold no weight unless we ourselves become tied to them – fastened by our own physical connection to this extraneous action.

In an effort to illuminate these invisible constraints and become conscious of the standards that govern them, Sara Morawetz intends to abandon Earth time and to instead live by time as experienced on Mars. A Martian day is 24h 39m 35.24s, approximately 2.7% longer than a standard day on Earth. Morawetz will live according to Mars time for a full (although approximated) cycle – that would see her ‘day’ gradually separate from Earth-bound standards, invert, and then slowly return to synchronicity, an action that should take approximately 37 days to complete. This performative action is being conducted in consultation with Dr. Michael Allison of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

This work is part of an ongoing exploration of the processes that underpin scientific action. Morawetz is interested in the manner in which the constituent elements of the ’Scientific Method’ – namely observation, experimentation, method (as action) and standardization – are recounted within artistic practice and how these concepts can be further leveraged by artistic inquiry. Through her work, she aims to unravel the mechanics of scientific thinking by asking: what is method / observation / standardization? and, furthermore, how do these terms function outside scientific parameters in the fluid and mercurial sphere of artistic application?. Derived from the core principles of science, her work examines experimental investigation as a way of thinking and a mode of working, utilizing the philosophy of science as a means of critically interpreting systems, actions and processes. It is in this breakdown of artistic and scientific thinking that she aims to evaluate the volatile space in between, to examine the reciprocity within conceptual systems and to validate a communal passage that seeks to filter art through a scientific idiom.

Morawetz’s work is both research and process-driven, often employing durational, repetitious and participatory components – elements akin to a scientific experiment. These performative actions, that either become or create the work, are devised to test and expose the internal processes of methodological labour – the exhaustive, the obsessive, the poetic and the absurd – aspects that are all inherent to scientific practices.

Sara Morawetz is a Ph.D. Candidate at Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney and an Australian Postgraduate Award recipient. She has been previously awarded the Martin Bequest Traveling scholarship and was a visiting scholar at Parsons School of Fine Art, The New School, NY in 2014. Her work has been exhibited in galleries within Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States.



Whitney Lynn: Rummage

Rummage | Press Release | Wong Kit Yi | Kai Vierstra | SeoKyeong Lee Yoon | Christine Wong Yap and Lauren Frances Adams

June 6 – June 29, 2015
Opening Reception: June 6, 7-9 pm

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Whitney Lynn presents Rummage, a series of performative installations at Open Source Gallery.

Garage sales have a long history, tracing back to the early 1800s, when shipyards would sell off unclaimed cargo–called “rommage”–at discounted rates. Eventually moving from the docks into private yards and community spaces, the modern garage sale exploded as both a tradition and phenomenon in the 1950s with the flood of consumer goods entering the market. Today rummage sales are a staple of summer and many shoppers are driven by “the find,” combing through others’ castoffs in an effort to discover a coveted treasure.

Throughout the month of June, each week of Rummage will feature a rotating artist’s interpretation of a garage sale. Lynn has invited an array of New York-based artists with conceptually-oriented practices to participate, including Wong Kit Yi, Kai Vierstra, SeoKyeong Lee Yoon, Christine Wong Yap, and Lauren Frances Adams. Welcoming each collaborator to freely interpret the premise, responses variously examine themes of sales, investment, value, marketplace, unwanted materials, and community engagement. Installations will range from collections of transformed toys to participatory artworks.

Rummage is an extension of Lynn’s previous performance-based projects, exploring aspects of vernacular cultures and casting others to investigate the messy intersections of art and life. She is interested in the places where boundaries, environments, and actions collide. Playing with performance and public space, Rummage will create a series of participatory experiences that highlight the history inherent within commonplace objects and often overlooked traditions.

Whitney Lynn implements a variety of media–including sculpture, performance, video, and drawing–to question ideas of boundaries and containment, history and restaging, context, and form. Lynn received her BFA in Sculpture + Extended Media from Virginia Commonwealth University and her MFA in New Genres from the San Francisco Art Institute. She is currently a member of the Stanford University faculty.

Schedule:

June 6, 7-9pm: Wong Kit Yi, Forbidden Flickers/no-no films
June 11-13, 2-7pm: Kai Vierstra, Airavata’s Honesty Boxed Bazaar
June 18-20, 2-7pm: SeoKyeong Lee Yoon, Used Toys for Sale
June 25-26, 3-8pm and June 27, 1-6pm: Christine Wong Yap and Lauren Frances Adams, a handle, a stem, a hook, a ring, a loop



Yun-Woo Choi: Endless, Seamless

Endless, Seamless | Installation View | Press Release | Livestream | On Brooklynhits.com | On Long Island for Sale | On Disinfo

May 2 – May 31, 2015
Opening Reception: May 2, 7-9 pm

Yun-Woo Choi, From the Beginning, 2011

From the Beginning, 2011, Magazines, spray paint, resin, stainless wire

Yun-Woo Choi presents “Endless, Seamless,” an installation for Open Source Gallery.

Given the ubiquity of printed matter in daily life, it is no wonder that people often become more concerned with the representation of a thing than the thing itself. In pop culture, print and images in the pages of magazines and newspapers illustrate our world through depictions of cars, celebrities, and lifestyles. In religion, many believe that the Holy Bible, Koran, and Buddhist scripts exist as sacred objects. Yet, constructed out of symbolic language, all of these texts and images only function as a kind of map, a tangible object that points to an existence outside of our four-dimensional perception. According to philosopher William James, there are two ways of knowing things: immediately and intuitively or conceptually and representatively. By folding, tearing, and combining, Yun-Woo Choi obfuscates the meanings constructed in two-dimensional printed material in an attempt to deliver intuitive feelings to the viewer.

Philosopher Ken Wilber posits that thought and text represent a process of compressing three-dimensional reality into a two-dimensional illusion of the real world. Objectivity becomes an impossibility if one’s own thoughts always translate the world into subjective representation. In theoretical physics, scientists discuss theories involving eleven space-time dimensions that cannot be perceived, yet exist all around us. Within these dimensions, there would exist a multitude of ways to perceive and exist in the world. Choi takes these theories into consideration to speculate about the possibility for one to exist in multiple realities where invisible and untouchable subjective concepts such as emotions may manifest physically, supported by different laws of physics.

“Endless, Seamless” presents an intensely physical, yet fragmented and ethereal experience that allows for dualities to coalesce. Choi explores the relationship between the banal and profound, allowing seemingly opposite concepts to fragment and become intertwined as he constructs a subjective and ever-changing experience for the viewer. Encountering the philosophical and theoretical simultaneously within his elegant sculptures, one can begin to comprehend the numerous hidden and overlapping dimensions in reality.

Yun-Woo Choi is a Brooklyn-based artist who was born in Seoul, Korea. He received a BFA and MFA in sculpture from Hong-Ik University, and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts. Choi was a recipient of the Jung-Ang Fine Art Prize in 2007 and participated in the Anderson Ranch Art Center residency program in Aspen in 2010. He recently won the award of Year in Review in the Sculpture and Installation category from See Me in 2014. His works have been featured in the Chungju International Craft Biennial, Busan International Biennial, as well as several group shows in Seoul, Los Angeles, and New York.



Jasmine Murrell: Some Impossibility Without A Name

Some Impossibility Without A Name | Press Release | Installation View

April 4 – April 26, 2015
Opening Reception: April 4, 7-9 pm
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Jasmine Murrell presents “Some Impossibility Without A Name,” an installation for Open Source Gallery.

How can we begin again at the end? Where is the beginning of nothingness? Where is the end of our illusions dressed as mass media and 24-hour TV? How bad did it hurt before — or are we just moving in waves? “Some Impossibility Without A Name” is inspired by the undercurrent that holds us all, the substance older than thought, the elements we are made of and will eventually return to.

Murrell manipulates and transforms iconic materials to create alternate forms, constructing new objects, spaces, and realities that reflect our phenomenal way of life. She reframes historic associations that we may have with materials and objects to revisit the past while re-inventing the present. Murrell’s work reminds us of the events and history behind us, as well as the unknowable future that lies ahead. Humanity is constantly shifting and transforming – creating, remembering, forgetting. While it is easily obscured by the commotion of our daily lives, we are all a part of a much larger narrative than what we can see, connected throughout space and time. “Some Impossibility Without a Name” discovers the indefinable, yet palpable, ways in which trauma manifests and dissolves itself in our memories and histories.

Jasmine Murrell is a New York-based interdisciplinary artist. She received her BFA from the Parsons School of Design and her MFA from Hunter College. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally over the past decade in exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, Bronx Museum of the Arts, African-American Museum of Art, Art Basel, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit. Jasmine’s work has also been published in the New York Times, Amsterdam News, NY1 News, and the Detroit News. She is also a member of the artist collective HOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?, which will be exhibiting at the Rotterdam Museum this spring.



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Prosjektrom Normanns: Transcendental Tactility

Transcendental Tactility | Press Release | Artist Bios | Facebook Event February 10-27, 2016 Opening Reception: February 13, 2015 Prosjektrom Normanns presents Transcendental Tactility, a multi-media exhibition, at Open Source Gallery. Transcendental Tactility is a group exhibition curated by Norwegian artist-run space Prosjektrom Normanns that will explore abstract, poetic, and lyric expressions of existence and […]

upcoming

2016 Exhibitions
Videokaffe: Para-sites & Proto-types
Healing Arts Initiative: Sole Exchange
Rawiya
guerilla-art.mx
SiTE:LAB
Boa Mistura
Soap Box Derby 2016
Dimensions Variable
i Collective

past

/rive: Anamorphosis
Soup Kitchen 2015
Mira Gaberova: Statue of Everything
Savas Boyraz: Back Drop
Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu: Venus von Hamburg
Soap Box Derby 2015
Sara Morawetz: How the Stars Stand
Whitney Lynn: Rummage
Yun-Woo Choi: Endless, Seamless
Jasmine Murrell: Some Impossibility Without A Name
Tirtzah Bassel: I Want To Hold You Close
B. David Walsh: Extracted Bedroom Project
Lena Lapschina: Yes/No
Soup Kitchen 2014
Sofia Szamosi: Eat Me
Corina Reynolds: Northwestern Expansion
Emanuele Cacciatore: A Conversation with Consequence
Soap Box Workshops and Derby 2014
Mark Stilwell: The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beast (The Power of the Constructonauts)
Hubert Dobler: Roundabout
Arne Schreiber: Your Stripes
Katerina Marcelja: Fragment Series
Fuse-Works: Some Assembly Required
Anja Matthes: Out-Sight-In In-Sight-Out
Soup Kitchen 2013
Katarina Poliacikova: Until We Remember The Same
Miho Suzuki: Our Children Today
We Know Not Exactly Where or How
Soap Box Derby 2013
Keith Miller: Trees
Andrea Ray: Utopians Dance
Margrethe Aanestad: Herein
David D’Ostilio: The Chopping Block
Stefanie Koseff: To The Deep
Michael Poetschko: Zona
Soup Kitchen 2012
Kathleen Vance: From the Woods
Nick Kline: Gilgo Beach
Soap Box Camp and Derby 2012
Patrick Cadenhead: Spring and Renewal