2017 Exhibitions

In 2017, exhibits at Open Source will explore culture through historical approaches, tradition and social practice. Through both solo and curated group exhibitions, artists will involve our community in contemplation about the effects of political and social history on our contemporary circumstances. Through solo and curated group exhibitions featuring local, national and international artists, we will contemplate culture and traditional across generational and historical timescales.

Exhibitions will include:
Liinu Grönlund (multimedia and film)
Francesco Simeti (sculpture and installation)
Andrew Snyder (sculpture and performance)
Sana Obaid (video and installation)
Omar López-Chahoud (curator)
Reimagining Tradition (public art)
Kimberly Mayhorn (film and installation)



Kimberly Mayhorn: Transcend

Kimberly Mayhorn: Transcend | Press Release

October 26-November 25, 2017
Opening Reception: October 26, 6-9pm
We will be closed for gallery hours November 23-25. If you would like to see the exhibit that week, please make an appointment: contact@opensourcegallery.

Kimberly Mayhorn, Release, 2016, film still

Kimberly Mayhorn presents Transcend, a solo exhibition featuring video work at Open Source Gallery.

“Everything in Life is Vibration” – Albert Einstein

Humans are made of energy that is emitted everyday, affecting not only ourselves, but those around us. Mayhorn views energy that settles on the body over time as data. Whether interpersonal, political, historical, or cultural, this data creates invisible scars. Mayhorn views the body as a delicate organ that has the capacity to store energy frequencies of everyday experiences, systemic racism, inequality, generational trauma and is interested in how individuals recalibrate themselves.

Within the narratives presented in Transcend, Mayhorn explores how individuals heal, discharge negative data and carve out a space for themselves amid the noise. By conducting intimate interviews in her two-channel video, Release (2016), Mayhorn explores these ideas with five women as they share their own personal techniques of releasing and what that means to them. By scrutinizing preconceived notions about the concept of a “strong black woman,” Mayhorn does not explore how women carry burdens or any expectations of them, but how they carve out private spaces for themselves. In Chiquita (2017), a single channel video, Mayhorn’s subject explores ideas about self-care and self-preservation under the weight of personal and societal demands.

Kimberly Mayhorn is an Emmy-nominated video editor and self-taught multi-disciplinary artist utilizing installation, sculpture, theater, dance, sound, and video. Mayhorn is a Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Fellow and has exhibited at museums and galleries including The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Rush Arts, Five Myles, The African American Museum in Philadelphia, and The University Museum at Texas Southern University in Houston among others. She has participated in residencies at Yaddo, Socrates Sculpture Park, Atlantic Center for the Arts, HERE, University of Chicago Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, and Sculpture Space.

This exhibition is kindly supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts.



Reimagining Tradition

Reimagining Tradition | Map | Press Release | Leigh Davis | Erin Ellen Kelly | James Leonard | Jasmine Murrell | Nia I’man Smith | ULTRACULTURAL OTHERS | Panel Discussion | Volunteer

September 30-October 22, 2017
Panel Discussion: November 9, 6:30pm (Brooklyn Public Library)
Volunteer

James Leonard, The Tent of Casually Observed Phenologies, 2017 (photo by Anja Mattes)

September 30: James Leonard
October 8: Nia I’man Smith
October 14: Jasmine Murrell
October 15: Erin Ellen Kelly
October 19-21: ULTRACULTURAL OTHERS
October 20-22: Leigh Davis

Reimagining Tradition is a three-week exhibition developed by Open Source Gallery, to highlight intersections between socially engaged art and ritual practice. Reimagining Tradition will take place September 30 – October 22 as a series of site-specific projects by New York City-based artists. These pieces defy the constraints of traditional gallery exhibitions and blur modern distinctions between art and the sacred. We are excited to celebrate this collection of work that inspires introspection and activates compassion within the community and the art world at large.

Thank you to our project advisor and exhibition partners:
Nina Mehta, PARCEO, Green-Wood Cemetery, Kelly Street Garden, Inner Fields, Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn Greenway Initiative

This project is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts and the Joseph Robert Foundation.



The Fire Theory: ICE

English | Español | Press Release (English) | Press Release (Español) | Installation View | Ernesto Bautista’s “Joe’s Barbershop”

September 6-October 13, 2017
Opening Reception: September 6, 2017

Ernesto Bautista, New Promises/Nuevas Promesas, 2012, intervention project on trucks crossing the U.S. border

Those who left. Those who got lost. Those who arrived. Those who stayed. Those who came back.

The Fire Theory presents ICE, an exhibition, residency and collaborative project curated by Omar López-Chahoud at Open Source Gallery.

Immigration has been a cornerstone of the identity of the United States since its inception and the “American Dream” has been an often unattainable, yet inspiring dream for millions of immigrants from all over the world. Currently, racism and xenophobia limits the immigration that has made this country great, endangers immigrants and makes the path to citizenship inaccessible. I.C.E is the United States agency that is responsible for the border control, trade, immigration, deportation programs and as its name indicates, it generates a situation of freezing, a stand by between families, friends, on both sides of the border.

The Fire Theory is an El Salvador-based art collective formed by Víctor “Crack” Rodríguez, Melissa Guevara, Ernesto Bautista and Mauricio Kabistan. During ICE, Rodríguez will open Open Source Gallery as a workspace, as well as an exhibition space for the group. Guevara, Bautista and Kabistan, whose travel visas for this exhibition were denied, will remain in El Salvador, sending their work digitally to Open Source for exhibition. Over the course of ICE, the group will work together remotely, exchanging ideas, stories and artwork, to explore immigration, both in New York and El Salvador.

Rodríguez, whose performative actions examine social contradictions, will work with the community surrounding Open Source to gather stories of those who left their home countries to seek a better life. During gallery hours, Rodríguez will be in residence at Open Source, welcoming in visitors for discussion and collaboration. In El Salvador, Guevara, Bautista and Kabistan will talk with residents who did not or could not immigrate to the United States, exploring these stories through their own individual practices. While The Fire Theory has been separated by national boundaries, during ICE, they will continue to communicate, intertwining their investigations into a dialogue that will explore I.C.E., America and the American Dream.

Omar López-Chahoud has been the Artistic Director and Curator of Untitled since its founding in 2012. López-Chahoud has earned MFAs from Yale University School of Art and the Royal Academy of Art in London. As an independent curator, López-Chahoud has curated and co-curated numerous exhibitions in the United States and internationally. He curated the Nicaraguan Biennial in March 2014 and has participated in curatorial panel discussions at Artists’ Space, Art in General, MoMA PS1, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. He is currently a member of the Bronx Museum Acquisitions Committee.

The Fire Theory has curated and collaborated for exhibitions in El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Colombia, Switzerland, the United States and Norway. The Fire Theory has been published in Contemporary Languages from Central America by Luisa Fuentes Guaza and has participated in the X Biennial of Central America (2016), LAIC Latin American Arts for Inclusive Cities project (2016) and RE:CONSTRUCCIÓN (2017), a transnational project that explores the impact of the Salvadoran Civil War among many others.

This project is supported by the New York State Council on the Arts.



Sana Obaid: دیوار | De-war | Wall

Sana Obaid: دیوار | De-war | Wall | Press Release | Installation View | Volunteer | Performance Video

July 28-August 31, 2017
Opening reception: July 28, 7-9pm
Artist talk: August 13, 11am

I have never deliberately made art on political or social conditions.
– Sana Obaid (open call exhibition proposal, 2015)

You have not demonstrated that you have the ties that will compel you to return to your home country after your travel to the United States.
– Consulate General of the United States of America, Pakistan (visa rejection letter, 2017)

Sana Obaid presents دیوار | De-war | Wall, a multimedia exhibition at Open Source Gallery.

At a time when it is more important than ever to address the political and social significance of walls, travel and immigration, Sana Obaid will present دیوار | De-war | Wall at Open Source, an exhibition that explores borders and boundaries. دیوار | De-war | Wall will incorporate Obaid’s work with elements of life, such as her visa rejection letter, to create work that examines how she has not only been affected by metaphorical walls, but also political and social barriers that have prevented her movement and progress. As a work in progress, the exhibition will change throughout the month, transforming with the addition of video from Obaid’s performances in Pakistan, artist talks and volunteer-executed performances in Brooklyn.

In 2015, artist Sana Obaid submitted a proposal for a piece titled Making a Brick Wall during an open call for exhibitions. The proposal included a performance where the artist would create a wall around herself using fired bricks. Obaid described how, as a Pakistani woman, the society in which she lives has encouraged walls, limiting her experience of life. دیوار | De-war | Wall is an evolution of Obaid’s original proposal, exploring how walls can act as a metaphor, or even literal manifestation, for safety and comfort, yet block views of and interactions with our surroundings and our neighbors.

Obaid’s exhibition was scheduled for 2017. In late 2016, Open Source was notified that we had been awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support Obaid’s exhibit. In early 2017, Obaid began the process of applying for a visa to travel to the United States for the exhibition. In March 2017, Obaid’s daughter was born. In June 2017, Sana Obaid’s visa was denied.

Sana Obaid was trained as a miniaturist at the National College of Arts (Pakistan) and received her Masters in Art and Design at Beaconhouse National University (Pakistan). She has exhibited throughout Pakistan as spaces such as Alhamra Gallery, Art Scene Gallery, IVSAA Gallery and Chawkandi Gallery. She has also exhibited outside Pakistan in spaces such as Herbert Gallery (UK), Glynn Vivan Gallery (UK) and Annant Gallery (India).

This exhibition is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.



10th Annual South Slope Derby

2017 South Slope Derby | 2017 Derby Judges | Facebook Event | On CBS | In the New York Times | On Brooklyn Independent Television | 2016 Derby | 2015 Derby | 2014 Derby | 2013 Derby | 2012 Derby

August 26, 2017
Noon

Every year in the end of August you can experience the thrill of witnessing our participants from the summer Soap Box Workshop race their fun, funky, eco-friendly contraptions down 17th Street in Brooklyn.

Our 10th Annual South Slope Derby is set for August 26th 2017!

Since 2007, our Derby has been a staple of the neighborhood. Each year, the Soap Box Workshop encourages children to think outside the box. Children plan their inventions using sketches and calculations, bringing them to life with found and recycled objects as well as building materials. Over the course of the workshop, participants turn piles of seemingly useless trash into functional machines while learning about construction and design and, more importantly, having fun. Leading up to the race, kids test drive their gravity racers, ensuring the safety and functionality of each invention. At the Derby participants get to race their cars for real as friends, families, and neighbors cheer them on as they race down the street.

2017 Judges:
Carlos Menchaca (District 38 ,Council Member)
Elise Long (Spoke the Hub, Artistic Director and Founder)
Peter Reich (Creator of the Swift Folder Bicycle)
Katherine Moriwaki (Scrapyard Challenge, Co-Founder)
Donny Levit (New Pulp City, Editor-in-Chief)
Severn Clay-Youman (Civic Architecture Workshop, Founder)
Rebecca Daruger (826NYC, Director of Education)



Andrew Snyder: 9 Meditations

Andrew Snyder: 9 Meditations | Press Release | Anatomy of a Bowl Workshop | Installation View | Video

June 3-July 15, 2017
Opening Reception: June 3, 7-9pm
Artist Talk: June 17, 7pm
Performances: June 2 (1-3pm, 4-6pm, 7-9pm), June 3 (9-11am, 1-3pm, 5-7pm), June 17 (3-5pm)
Workshops: July 15, 3-5pm and 7-9pm

Andrew Snyder presents 9 Meditations, a performative installation at Open Source Gallery.

Traditionally, the act of throwing is merely a means to an end; the potter’s wheel, a tool. Customarily, the act of throwing is documented by firing the work. During 9 Meditations, Snyder, rather than relying on the finished product to demonstrate his skill, records his time on the potter’s wheel by transforming the fabric beneath the potter’s wheel into a canvas for the documentation of his work.

9 Meditations pays tribute to the tradition of demonstration by way of performance. There is a long history of demonstration in the crafts–whether weaving, smithing or throwing–as a performance that shows the mastery of the craftsman’s skill. Snyder does not place focus on the bowls made at the potter’s wheel, but concentrates on throwing. The repetitive process of throwing, as demonstrated during six two-hour performances the day before and the day of the opening reception of 9 Meditations, puts the potter into a state of meditation. While throwing, Snyder takes time to reflect, creating bowls that upon first look might appear similar, but result from a process that is ever-changing with the circumstances of Snyder’s reflection.

The monotony and boredom of repetition often leads Snyder into contemplation about the people in his life. Snyder incorporates his contemplation about friends, family and neighbors into the performance using fabric that reminds him of specific people. Fabrics are sought out by Snyder, an avid thrift store shopper, at secondhand shops or requested from those they represent. The found fabrics give insight into Snyder’s meditations, which transform each performance and bowl into something subtly different.

Andrew Snyder received a Bachelor of Science in Ceramics from Towson University in 2001. Upon graduation he began his career as a production potter at Eldreth Pottery in Oxford, PA. In 2010 he returned to Towson University to pursue his MFA in Sculpture. Snyder currently teaches ceramics and digital modeling at West Chester University where he is Assistant Professor of Art, ceramics area and object lab coordinator. Snyder previously exhibited 9 Meditations at Linfield College (Oregon). His work has been shown throughout the United States at spaces such as Baltimore Clayworks (MD), Knauer Gallery (PA), Wayne Art Center (PA), Academy of Fine Arts (VA), Thornhill Gallery (MO) and the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art (DE) among many others.



Francesco Simeti: Swell

Francesco Simeti: Swell | Press Release | Installation View | Artist Reception | Closing Reception | Volunteer with HomeGrown | Exhibit by the Brooklyn Urban Garden School | On Brooklyn Pulp

April 22-May 27, 2017
Opening Reception: April 22, 7-9pm
Closing Reception: May 25, 7-9pm
Exhibit by the Brooklyn Urban Garden School at Gowanus Canal Conservancy: June 3, 4-6pm

Francesco Simeti, Swell, 2017 (Photo by Dario Lasagni)

Francesco Simeti presents Swell, a theatrical installation at Open Source Gallery that explores human impact on the environment.

In Swell, Simeti transforms appropriated images from Brooklyn waterways, such as the Gowanus Canal, into a motorized installation in which the public can contemplate the consequences of human activity on our surroundings. The Gowanus Canal was built in the mid-1800s as an industrial transportation route. All of waste discharged into the canal over time has made the Gowanus Canal into one of the nation’s most seriously contaminated bodies of water. The canal was declared a Superfund site in 2010 yet remains the home of industrial factories, small businesses, artist studios and rapidly gentrifying residential areas. Currently the bottom of the canal is coated to a layer of toxic sediment–nicknamed “black mayonnaise”–that averages 10 feet thick, reaching 20 feet in some places. In a twist of irony, this sludge resembles a noxious primordial soup and microbes have evolved to live off the pollution. It seems that the canal has not only become uninhabitable for wildlife, but could be breeding new and previously unidentified organisms uniquely adapted to their putrid environment.

The diametrically opposed elements present in the history of the canal–life and death, order and destruction, reality and fiction, the light-hearted and the devastating–mirror Simeti’s practice, which amplifies multifaceted environmental, social and political concerns into an immersive, kinetic installation. Swell uses ornament and subtext as an instrument of political critique. Playful historical images of Coney Island rides and other human intervention along the water intertwine with scenes of flora and fauna that once flourished along the Gowanus Canal. Adopting a DIY aesthetic, Simeti takes inspiration from puppet theater and Baroque mechanical automata, which combined an awe of nature with an affinity for artifice, to explore the social, cultural and historical significance of Brooklyn waterways. Combining the installation with workshops, collaborative projects and partnerships with local organizations, Swell engages with the consequences of human activity on a local level, depicting nature as both a playground and a battle zone, and encourages action. Visitors are invited to explore different avenues of inquiry, taking time for self-reflection while simultaneously connecting with their community and its history.

Francesco Simeti (b. 1968, Italy) received his BA from the Accademia di Belle Arti (Italy). He has created public art projects in the NYC transit system at the 4th Avenue-9th Street Gowanus and the 18th Avenue Bensonhurst Gardens subway stations. Simeti has exhibited at spaces including the Risd Museum (USA), Art & Idea Gallery (Mexico) and Columbia University (USA). His work has been featured at the Shanghai Biennial (China), Palermo Gallery of Modern Art (Italy), MASS MoCA (USA), Musée de Design et d’Arts Appliqués Contemporains (Switzerland), and the Philadelphia Institute of Contemporary Art (USA).

This exhibit is kindly supported by the New York Council on the Arts. Extended programming is presented in collaboration with Gowanus Canal Conservancy, Brooklyn Urban Garden Charter School (BUGS), HomeGrown and City Parks Foundation/Partnership for Parks.

logos-simeti



Liinu Grönlund: It could have been

It could have been | Press release | Installation View | Artist talk | In Brooklyn Pulp

February 25-April 8, 2017
Opening reception: February 25, 7-9pm
Artist talk: February 27, 7-9pm

screen-shot-2016-10-05-at-13-43-10

“But at the risk of sounding anti-human–some of my best friends are human!–I will say that it is not, in the end, what’s most worth attending to. Right now, in the amazing moment that to us counts as the present, we are deciding, without quite meaning to, which evolutionary pathways will remain open and which will be forever closed. No other creature has managed this, and it will, unfortunately, be our most enduring legacy. The Sixth Extinction will continue to determine the course of life long after everything people have written and painted and built has been ground into dust and giant rats have–or have not–inherited the earth.” – Elizabeth Kolbert, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History

Liinu Grönlund presents It could have been, a multimedia installation at Open Source Gallery.

It could have been is a video essay; an associative collection of ideas, diary notes and dreamy images combining environmental issues and politics of recent years. The rat, an animal that is controversial, hated, feared and scientifically-used, is in the spotlight. Grönlund became interested in rats after reading The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, a book in which author Elizabeth Kolbert explores human influence on the climate and environment. Over the history of the planet, there have been five major mass extinctions where the biodiversity was suddenly decimated. We are currently in the midst of the sixth mass extinction: the largest since the event that killed the dinosaurs. Throughout history rats have proven to be an effective colonizer, flourishing in each new environment they find and destroying endemic species populations while propagating at rapid rates.

Today corruption and imbalance of power across the globe are painfully obvious dilemmas, yet peace agreements, equality and climate change solutions still seem unreachable. Inspired by rats’ talent for survival and their similarities to humans, It could have been explores the dark fantasy of rats inheriting the earth from humans. Grönlund has spent time observing rats’ behavior, witnessing for herself the adaptability, empathy and intelligence that researchers have shown them to possess. She explores ideas about how to transfer knowledge to another species, reading from her favorite authors to the rats in an effort to make the information immortal. It could have been connects humanity to the natural world, intertwining our future and current events to other possibilities. Linking an alternate history–or prediction of the future–to a feeling of powerlessness, It could have been questions if there is still time and ways to create something alternative, something entirely new, to replace our violent man-made systems that destroy both biodiversity and humanity.

Liinu Grönlund (b. 1984) is a visual artist and filmmaker based in Helsinki. She received her MA in documentary film from the University of Art and Design (Helsinki) and an MFA from the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts. Grönlund’s work often takes the form of a poetic film that combine personal experiences, politics and history. She is interested in remoteness and extremes, working together with scientists and activists. Her work has been exhibited at places such as Galleria Huuto (Finland), Finnish Museum of Photography (Finland, curated by Boshko Boskovic) and Studio Voltaire (UK, curated by Jennifer Higgie and Rebecca Warren) among others. Her work has been shown at festivals such as the Savonlinna International Nature Film Festival (Finland), Tampere Film Festival (Finland), Wild-screen (Ireland) and the Yebizo International Festival for Art and Alternative Visions (Japan, curated by Junya Yamamine) among others. Grönlund’s film about scientists working in the vanishing forests of Madagascar will premier in May 2017. In Fall 2017, Grönlund will begin an artist residency with Triangle Arts.

This exhibition is kindly supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, AVEK Promotion Centre for Audiovisual Culture and Arts Promotion Centre Finland.

logos_liinu



The Middle Passage

The Middle Passage | The Vanderbilt Republic | The People Movers | Press Release | Installation view | Video | Dale Williams Mural | Tickets
January 28-February 19, 2017

middle-passage-03

The Vanderbilt Republic and The People Movers present The Middle Passage, a performance art narrative in site-specific camera obscura at Open Source Gallery.

January 21-22: Public preview (Reserve your seat)
January 28: Elsa Waithe (Tickets)
February 4-5: Dante Brown | Warehouse Dance x Jayson Smith (Tickets)
February 11-12: Same as Sister (S.A.S.) (Tickets)
February 18-19: Dances for Solidarity x Chee Malabar (Tickets)

The Middle Passage is a performance art series curated by George Del Barrio and Kate Ladenheim using a focused camera obscura with multiple projections of the world outside the gallery to create surface-mapped stages upside-down and backwards on the gallery walls. For this project, the residential block outside of Open Source has been offered to local artists as a laboratory for a reinterpretation of the space and the landscape. The project aims to transform our shared spaces into a spectacle that allows the physics of the universe to bend in support of the artists.

During our day to day, we operate with a set of assumptions about property, space, race and gender; inside of the obscura, these rules are turned on their head. Artists of color will present new work within an illuminated blackout that requires patience and observation for the viewer to fully discover. Within the blacked-out gallery, the artists will fill the space with their light, bringing site-specific to a darkened space as a subtle act of activism. Every day the theater will fade as the light dies, offering a metaphor for resilience. One act outside can be two inside; the artists in The Middle Passage will bring hope and light to dark spaces.

The Vanderbilt Republic (VR) is a creative agency based in Gowanus, Brooklyn. The agency was formed to catalyze the impact of creative expression in all modes. VR sees artists as leaders, activists and agents for positive change. Through their work with the creative diaspora, VR offers boutique solutions in: creative production, design, direction, artist representation and landscape projection design. George Del Barrio is VR’s founder and creative director.

The People Movers is a dance and production collaborative under the direction of Kate Ladenheim. It is the mission of The People Movers to create complex works that reveal the inherently performative qualities of our world through thoughtful and technical movement, and to support the arts community as a whole by organizing relevant and engaging productions. In short, The People Movers make performances, and make performances happen.

Advance admission tickets ($20) will be available at vanderbiltrepublic.com. Contact us for more information.



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Soup Kitchen 2017

English | Español | 中国 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 December 1-31, 2017 7-9pm SIGN-UP HERE! | VIEW CALENDAR Each year the Open Source Soup Kitchen brings together artists, cooks, friends, and neighbors for a month of cooking, eating, sharing and celebrating! SIGN-UP HERE! […]

upcoming

Pirmin Hagen
Tomás Rivas
Matthew Jensen
Xyza Bacani
Betty Yu
Khaled Jarrar
Immy Mali

past

2017 Exhibitions
Kimberly Mayhorn: Transcend
Reimagining Tradition
The Fire Theory: ICE
Sana Obaid: دیوار | De-war | Wall
10th Annual South Slope Derby
Andrew Snyder: 9 Meditations
Francesco Simeti: Swell
Liinu Grönlund: It could have been
The Middle Passage
Soup Kitchen 2016
2016 Exhibitions
Another Space: Permanent Construction
i Collective: Once Upon Unfolding Times
Dimensions Variable: Multidisciplinary
South Slope Derby 2016
Boa Mistura: Spread Love, It’s The Brooklyn Way
SiTE:LAB: Nothing Is Destroyed
guerilla-art.mx: Transgression
Rawiya: In Her Absence I Created Her Image
HAI: Sole Exchange
Videokaffe: Para-sites & Proto-types
Prosjektrom Normanns: Transcendental Tactility
/rive: Anamorphosis
Soup Kitchen 2015
Mira Gaberova: Statue of Everything
Savas Boyraz: Back Drop
Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu: Venus von Hamburg
Soap Box Derby 2015
Sara Morawetz: How the Stars Stand
Whitney Lynn: Rummage
Yun-Woo Choi: Endless, Seamless
Jasmine Murrell: Some Impossibility Without A Name
Tirtzah Bassel: I Want To Hold You Close
B. David Walsh: Extracted Bedroom Project
Lena Lapschina: Yes/No
Soup Kitchen 2014
Sofia Szamosi: Eat Me
Corina Reynolds: Northwestern Expansion
Emanuele Cacciatore: A Conversation with Consequence