Soup Kitchen

December 1-31, 2017

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Each year the Open Source Soup Kitchen brings together artists, cooks, friends, and neighbors for a month of cooking, eating, sharing and celebrating!

For as many nights of the month as we have volunteers, we will provide the cookware and utensils–and our volunteer chef of the evening will be responsible to a “one-pot meal” (usually a soup or stew) that can feed approximately 15-20 people. All meals are served between 7:00-9:00pm. We welcome all kinds of unique dishes from any ethnic tradition! The cook of the night is also responsible for incorporating an artistic element into the evening–it can be a one-night exhibit, musical performance, short play, or decoration of the gallery!

SIGN-UP HERE!

Attendees of the Soup Kitchen are neighbors, artists, people who are down on their luck, or some who are simply hungry. Sometimes the conversation flows easily, sometimes not, but the food is nearly always tasty (it’s New York, after all–we have standards!) Join us for good food, good art, and good conversation–and bring your friends, family, and neighbors!

This is a free event. If you would like to be a guest, stop by Open Source any night in December between 7:00pm and 9:00pm!

This year’s Soup Kitchen is dedicated to Tony Kalangis.

For the last several years, Tony was an important and warm presence at the Soup Kitchen. He was there most every night in December, helping the Open Source staff and volunteers to clean and serve, greeting guests, telling stories and making everyone feel at home. Tony was responsible for an incredible amount of outreach to local shelters and soup kitchens, which broadened our audience and created an amazing diversity of guests every night, helping all of us to broaden our worldviews.

Tony passed away this year and will be greatly missed. We are dedicating the 2017 Soup Kitchen to Tony’s memory. In his honor, we will be accepting donations for local shelters and soup kitchens. More info to come on what supplies are needed.



10th Anniversary Fundraiser

Tickets | Event Information | Guest Speakers | Art for Auction

December 2, 2017
7:00pm
Early Bird Tickets: $60

Join us to celebrate an amazing 10 years of Open Source–and raise money to support our next 20 years!

Over the past 10 years, Open Source has connected our community to artists from all over the world, shared stories, encouraged children’s creativity and spread love through public art. Whether we’ve discussed art with you over coffee during a Sunday morning cHURCH or over a drink at an opening reception, we have enjoyed sharing our work with you.

Each year, our annual fundraiser has a larger impact on programming than the last. Help us celebrate 10 years and support our future programming!

Our 10th Anniversary Celebration will include food, drinks, raffles and a silent auction. Guest speakers will include Emily Nussbaum (The New Yorker) and Elizabeth Grady (A Blade of Grass)!

Generous donations by local and international artists will be available during the silent auction. View the art for auction here!

Thank you to our amazing sponsors: Warsteiner, Associated Market, Big Nose Full Body and Empanada Loca. All proceeds support free and low-cost public programming at Open Source.

This year the gallery saw amazing exhibitions by Francesco Simeti, Liinu Gronlund, Andrew Snyder, Sana Obaid, Kimberly Mayhorn, The Fire Theory and other NYC-based artists during Reimagining Tradition. Our children’s programming received a new name–Koko NYC–a new look and greatly expanded our offerings throughout New York City! We heard powerful stories during How to Build a Fire and learned a lot during the cHURCH. Now, we need your help to keep our programming incredible for years to come!

Early bird tickets ($60) will be available until November 25!

Can’t make it to the fundraiser? Donate $25 or more here to be entered in a raffle to win a piece of art selected by the gallery!



Drink & DrawBots

September 20, 2017
7:30pm
$20 suggested donation

Join us for a night of drinking and creating machines that draw and paint. Successfully make a DrawBot art-generating machine and your hands will be free for more–you guessed it–drinking!

$20 suggested donation will get you unlimited drinks and drawbot-making! All levels of experience with electronics, drawing, and drinking are welcome (21+ for alcohol). Supplies will be provided by us. All donations support free and low-cost programming at Open Source!

This event will be led by Eric Wood. Eric is a front end engineer, a tinkerer and displaced Austinite. Sometimes he makes music even, but really he just wants to build cool things.

This event is inspired by our BitBots after school program. Open Source Gallery has taught BitBots workshops in multiple schools, the MoMA, The Cooper Hewitt Design Center, the Children’s Museum of Manhattan, and at a TEDxYouth Day event at the Brooklyn Museum. It is a STEAM initiative that invites students to innovate, prototype, iterate, design and incorporate new technology with other materials to make something that does something. We use littleBits, simple electronic modules, each with specific functions, which can be snapped together with magnets to create large and elaborate circuits for prototyping and play. At Drink & DrawBots, we create generative art (created with the use of an automonous system) by created DrawBots that can often function as sculptures in their own right.



Reimagining Tradition Panel Discussion

Reimagining Tradition | Map | Press Release | Leigh Davis | Erin Ellen Kelly | James Leonard | Jasmine Murrell | Nia I’man Smith | ULTRACULTURAL OTHERS | Panel Discussion | Volunteer

November 9, 2017
6:30-8:30pm
Brooklyn Public Library Info Commons (10 Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn)
Watch on Livestream here

James Leonard, The Tent of Casually Observed Phenologies, 2017 (photo by Anja Mattes)

Reimagining Tradition is a program designed around conversation, engagement and investigation. After the conclusion of the project, Open Source will present a panel discussion with the artists involved, moderated by Nina Mehta (PARCEO), to explore ritual, tradition, social practice, what has been learned and what questions have been raised.

Panelists:
Katie Cercone
Leigh Davis
Erin Ellen Kelly
James Leonard
Jasmine Murrell
Nia I’man Smith

Nina Mehta is a co-coordinator at PARCEO and has a background in anthropology. She received her BA from Barnard College and her MA from The New School for Social Research. Mehta has worked in many contexts with a wide range of community groups and organizations on collaborative research, education, cultural organizing and movement-building through neighborhood assemblies, public events and participatory conversations. PARCEO collaborates with a wide range of communities and institutions that organize and conduct research for social and. They are rooted in the principles of Participatory Action Research (PAR), a framework for engaging in research and organizing for social justice that is rooted in a community’s own knowledge, wisdom and experience. PAR recognizes that those most impacted by systemic injustice are in the best position to understand and analyze their needs and challenges and to organize for social change. PARCEO offers training, resources, seminars and one-on-one support for individuals, organizations and community-based groups that help them to better address the needs and concerns of their communities.



10th Annual South Slope Derby

2017 South Slope Derby | 2017 Derby Judges | Facebook Event | On CBS | In the New York Times | On Brooklyn Independent Television | 2016 Derby | 2015 Derby | 2014 Derby | 2013 Derby | 2012 Derby

August 26, 2017
Noon

Every year in the end of August you can experience the thrill of witnessing our participants from the summer Soap Box Workshop race their fun, funky, eco-friendly contraptions down 17th Street in Brooklyn.

Our 10th Annual South Slope Derby is set for August 26th 2017!

Since 2007, our Derby has been a staple of the neighborhood. Each year, the Soap Box Workshop encourages children to think outside the box. Children plan their inventions using sketches and calculations, bringing them to life with found and recycled objects as well as building materials. Over the course of the workshop, participants turn piles of seemingly useless trash into functional machines while learning about construction and design and, more importantly, having fun. Leading up to the race, kids test drive their gravity racers, ensuring the safety and functionality of each invention. At the Derby participants get to race their cars for real as friends, families, and neighbors cheer them on as they race down the street.

2017 Judges:
Carlos Menchaca (District 38 ,Council Member)
Elise Long (Spoke the Hub, Artistic Director and Founder)
Peter Reich (Creator of the Swift Folder Bicycle)
Katherine Moriwaki (Scrapyard Challenge, Co-Founder)
Donny Levit (New Pulp City, Editor-in-Chief)
Severn Clay-Youman (Civic Architecture Workshop, Founder)
Rebecca Daruger (826NYC, Director of Education)



Ikarus Play

Sunday, August 6th at 6 and 7 pm
Monday, August 7th at 7 and 8 pm

Dramahound Productions and Open Source Gallery are pleased to announce the premiere of a one-act play by Anne Phelan, The Ikarus Play. It will be performed Sunday, August 6th at 6 and 7 pm, and Monday, August 7th at 7 and 8 pm at Open Source Gallery, 306 17th Street (near Sixth Avenue), Park Slope. Admission is free.

The Ikarus Play is inspired by its current exhibition of video of work by Pakistani artist Sana Obaid. It features Kendra Mittermeyer as Deedee (Daedalus) and Emily Ann Banks as Kara (Ikarus). The director is Christie Marie Clark (Anne Phelan’s They All Know Me, Thespian Production Slam-a-Thon; Clown Love, Strawberry One-Act Festival; The Diner, Caravan Play Festival), with costume design by Cathy Small.

The Ikarus Play explores the classic myth as the family prepares for their flight to freedom from Crete, and ultimately its tragic ending. Originally, the play was to be performed with Obaid’s work on-site, but her visa was denied by the US., even though her visit was funded by the NEA. This production and a video representation of her work is going forward in spite of this turn of events.

This is Anne Phelan and Dramahound’s seventh production at Open Source; previous plays include Brooklyn Lighthouse; Deconstruction; Mi Tigre, My Lover; a reading of The Tiger Play; Olmsted in Autumn; and Venus von Merkel (directed by Christie Marie Clark).



Drink & DrawBots

July 19, 2017
7:30pm
$20 suggested donation

Join us for a night of drinking and creating machines that draw and paint. Successfully make a DrawBot art-generating machine and your hands will be free for more–you guessed it–drinking!

$20 suggested donation will get you unlimited drinks and drawbot-making! All levels of experience with electronics, drawing, and drinking are welcome (21+ for alcohol). Supplies will be provided by us. All donations support free and low-cost programming at Open Source!

This event will be led by Eric Wood. Eric is a front end engineer, a tinkerer and displaced Austinite. Sometimes he makes music even, but really he just wants to build cool things.

This event is inspired by our BitBots after school program. Open Source Gallery has taught BitBots workshops in multiple schools, the MoMA, The Cooper Hewitt Design Center, the Children’s Museum of Manhattan, and at a TEDxYouth Day event at the Brooklyn Museum. It is a STEAM initiative that invites students to innovate, prototype, iterate, design and incorporate new technology with other materials to make something that does something. We use littleBits, simple electronic modules, each with specific functions, which can be snapped together with magnets to create large and elaborate circuits for prototyping and play. At Drink & DrawBots, we create generative art (created with the use of an automonous system) by created DrawBots that can often function as sculptures in their own right.



Sara Bouchard House Concert

July 15, 2017
Reception: 8:00pm
Performance: 9:00pm

257 17th St., Brooklyn

Sound artist, conceptual songwriter and longtime South Slope neighbor Sara Bouchard premiered her song cycle The News: Monday-Friday at Open Source in 2012. With the work’s ecological and political themes growing in relevance today, she reprises the performance in an intimate house concert setting accompanied by her husband Alan Biller on upright bass. A reception will follow.

The News: Monday-Friday is a futuristic folk tale of migration which Bouchard performs on acoustic guitar, mandolin and autoharp. Bouchard wrote the ten songs over two spans of five consecutive weekdays, collaging the lyrics entirely from words and phrases cut from the daily newspaper. Through this intensive process a story emerged:
Uprooted from their homeland by a string of natural disasters, a fictional community grapples with finding a new home amidst rising waters. A kaleidoscope of characters parade by: a mysterious religious leader, a haughty politician, a mourning mother, a stranger with bright ideas… As the story unfolds through various perspectives, an underlying concern sets in: With our landscape changing around us, where will we go, who will we become, and how will we hold onto our past?

Sara Bouchard is a multidisciplinary artist whose work explores the intersection of sound, story and environment. Born in California, Bouchard received her B.A. from Yale University in 2003. She has exhibited and performed across NYC, including at The Center for Book Arts, The American Folk Art Museum, Dumbo Arts Center, Proteus Gowanus and Open Source, as well as in the Berlin Underground. Her piece Weather Box was published by Fuse Works Multiples & Editions in 2014. She is known for her work with Americana string band Union Street Preservation Society and also performs as Sara Bouchard & the Salt Parade. She has been accepted as an MFA candidate at Virginia Commonwealth University beginning in the fall.

More info about Sara Bouchard.



Anatomy of a Bowl Workshop

Andrew Snyder: 9 Meditations | Press Release | Anatomy of a Bowl Workshop | Installation View | Video

July 15, 2017
Kids workshop: 3-5pm
Adults workshop: 7-9pm
Suggested donation: $20

On July 15 learn how to make pinched bowls with artist Andrew Snyder!

Supplies (and drinks, 21+) will be provided by Open Source. All donations support free and low-cost programs at Open Source!

Traditionally, the act of throwing is merely a means to an end; the potter’s wheel, a tool. Customarily, the act of throwing is documented by firing the work. During “9 Meditations,” Snyder, rather than relying on the finished product to demonstrate his skill, records his time on the potter’s wheel by transforming the fabric beneath the potter’s wheel into a canvas for the documentation of his work.

“9 Meditations” pays tribute to the tradition of demonstration by way of performance. There is a long history of demonstration in the crafts–whether weaving, smithing or throwing–as a performance that shows the mastery of the craftsman’s skill. Snyder does not place focus on the bowls made at the potter’s wheel, but concentrates on throwing. The repetitive process of throwing, as demonstrated during six two-hour performances the day before and the day of the opening reception of “9 Meditations,” puts the potter into a state of meditation. While throwing, Snyder takes time to reflect, creating bowls that upon first look might appear similar, but result from a process that is ever-changing with the circumstances of Snyder’s reflection.

The monotony and boredom of repetition often leads Snyder into contemplation about the people in his life. Snyder incorporates his contemplation about friends, family and neighbors into the performance using fabric that reminds him of specific people. Fabrics are sought out by Snyder, an avid thrift store shopper, at secondhand shops or requested from those they represent. The found fabrics give insight into Snyder’s meditations, which transform each performance and bowl into something subtly different.

Andrew Snyder received a Bachelor of Science in Ceramics from Towson University in 2001. Upon graduation he began his career as a production potter at Eldreth Pottery in Oxford, PA. In 2010 he returned to Towson University to pursue his MFA in Sculpture. Snyder currently teaches ceramics and digital modeling at West Chester University where he is Assistant Professor of Art, ceramics area and object lab coordinator. Snyder previously exhibited 9 Meditations at Linfield College (Oregon). His work has been shown throughout the United States at spaces such as Baltimore Clayworks (MD), Knauer Gallery (PA), Wayne Art Center (PA), Academy of Fine Arts (VA), Thornhill Gallery (MO) and the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art (DE) among many others.



Drink & DrawBots

June 21, 2017
7:30pm
Tickets

DRINK & DRAWBOTS IS BACK!

Join us for a night of drinking and creating machines that draw and paint. Successfully make a DrawBot art-generating machine and your hands will be free for more–you guessed it–drinking!

SUGGESTED DONATION: $20
THIS EVENT IS OPEN FOR ALL ADULTS 21+

All levels of experience with electronics, drawing, and drinking are welcome. Supplies will be provided by us. All donations support free and low-cost programming at Open Source!

This event will be led by Eric Wood. Eric is a front end engineer, a tinkerer and displaced Austinite. Sometimes he makes music even, but really he just wants to build cool things.

This event is inspired by our BitBots after school program. Open Source Gallery has taught BitBots workshops in multiple schools, the MoMA, The Cooper Hewitt Design Center, the Children’s Museum of Manhattan, and at a TEDxYouth Day event at the Brooklyn Museum. It is a STEAM initiative that invites students to innovate, prototype, iterate, design and incorporate new technology with other materials to make something that does something. We use littleBits, simple electronic modules, each with specific functions, which can be snapped together with magnets to create large and elaborate circuits for prototyping and play. At Drink & DrawBots, we create generative art (created with the use of an automonous system) by created DrawBots that can often function as sculptures in their own right.



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on view now

Kimberly Mayhorn: Transcend

Kimberly Mayhorn: Transcend | Press Release October 26-November 25, 2017 Opening Reception: October 26, 6-9pm Kimberly Mayhorn presents Transcend, a solo exhibition featuring video work at Open Source Gallery. “Everything in Life is Vibration” – Albert Einstein Humans are made of energy that is emitted everyday, affecting not only ourselves, but those around us. Mayhorn […]

upcoming

Pirmin Hagen
Tomás Rivas
Matthew Jensen
Xyza Bacani
Betty Yu
Khaled Jarrar
Immy Mali
Soup Kitchen 2017

past

2017 Exhibitions
Reimagining Tradition
The Fire Theory: ICE
Sana Obaid: دیوار | De-war | Wall
10th Annual South Slope Derby
Andrew Snyder: 9 Meditations
Francesco Simeti: Swell
Liinu Grönlund: It could have been
The Middle Passage
Soup Kitchen 2016
2016 Exhibitions
Another Space: Permanent Construction
i Collective: Once Upon Unfolding Times
Dimensions Variable: Multidisciplinary
South Slope Derby 2016
Boa Mistura: Spread Love, It’s The Brooklyn Way
SiTE:LAB: Nothing Is Destroyed
guerilla-art.mx: Transgression
Rawiya: In Her Absence I Created Her Image
HAI: Sole Exchange
Videokaffe: Para-sites & Proto-types
Prosjektrom Normanns: Transcendental Tactility
/rive: Anamorphosis
Soup Kitchen 2015
Mira Gaberova: Statue of Everything
Savas Boyraz: Back Drop
Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu: Venus von Hamburg
Soap Box Derby 2015
Sara Morawetz: How the Stars Stand
Whitney Lynn: Rummage
Yun-Woo Choi: Endless, Seamless
Jasmine Murrell: Some Impossibility Without A Name
Tirtzah Bassel: I Want To Hold You Close
B. David Walsh: Extracted Bedroom Project
Lena Lapschina: Yes/No
Soup Kitchen 2014
Sofia Szamosi: Eat Me
Corina Reynolds: Northwestern Expansion
Emanuele Cacciatore: A Conversation with Consequence
Box Car Workshops and Derby 2014