Andrew Snyder

July-September 2017

2_Snyder_Mark of a Day

Andrew Snyder presents Mark of a Day, a performative installation at Open Source Gallery.

Traditionally the act of throwing is merely a means to an end; the potter’s wheel, a tool. How can the means be separate from the end? The means should determine the end. There is a truthfulness to work that does not hide the manner in which it is produced. When one commands a skill, there becomes an artistry shown in the process of performing that skill. The potter’s wheel is no different. There is a long history of demonstration in the crafts, whether it is weaving, smithing, or throwing. It is really a performance showing the mastery of the craftsman’s skill. Thus showing the audience the means that the end product is derived. This series is paying tribute to the tradition of demonstration by way of performance. Snyder is not making bowls on the potter’s wheel; he is simply throwing. It is the process of throwing that matters. Still, the documentation of the process is also very important. Customarily, the act of throwing is documented simply by firing the work. However, this piece shows the passage of time on the potter’s wheel, not by producing pots, but the mark that is left from throwing for a fixed length of time. Since his roots are in blue collar production pottery, he will spend the “normal” work day of 9 am to 5 pm at the potter’s wheel throwing nothing but small bowls. The bowls which are thrown are assembled in “boards” of 10. In production, a board is a measurement of a predetermined number of pots, and the number of pots is determined by how many will fit on a shelf; in this case, ten bowls equal one board. 

This series is capturing that feeling of a day in production on canvas.

Andrew Snyder received a BS in ceramics and an MFA in sculpture from Towson University. He is currently an assistant professor at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. He has presented work in solo exhibitions at Knauer Gallery (PA), Saints and Sinners Gallery (MD) and Mulberry Art Gallery (PA). His work has been featured in group shows at The Art Trust (PA), Baltimore Clayworks (MD), Academy of Fine Arts Lynchburg (VA), Kevin Lehman Gallery (PA) and Thornhill Gallery (MO) among others.



on view now

Liinu Grönlund: It could have been

It could have been | Press release | Artist talk February 25-April 8, 2017 Opening reception: February 25, 7-9pm Artist talk: February 27, 7-9pm “But at the risk of sounding anti-human–some of my best friends are human!–I will say that it is not, in the end, what’s most worth attending to. Right now, in the […]

upcoming

2017 Exhibitions
Liinu Grönlund: It could have been
Francesco Simeti
Sana Obaid
Andrew Snyder
Omar López-Chahoud
Kimberly Mayhorn

past

The Middle Passage
Soup Kitchen 2016
2016 Exhibitions
Another Space: Permanent Construction
i Collective: Once Upon Unfolding Times
Dimensions Variable: Multidisciplinary
South Slope Derby 2016
Boa Mistura: Spread Love, It’s The Brooklyn Way
SiTE:LAB: Nothing Is Destroyed
guerilla-art.mx: Transgression
Rawiya: In Her Absence I Created Her Image
HAI: Sole Exchange
Videokaffe: Para-sites & Proto-types
Prosjektrom Normanns: Transcendental Tactility
/rive: Anamorphosis
Soup Kitchen 2015
Mira Gaberova: Statue of Everything
Savas Boyraz: Back Drop
Cristian Bors & Marius Ritiu: Venus von Hamburg
Soap Box Derby 2015
Sara Morawetz: How the Stars Stand
Whitney Lynn: Rummage
Yun-Woo Choi: Endless, Seamless
Jasmine Murrell: Some Impossibility Without A Name
Tirtzah Bassel: I Want To Hold You Close
B. David Walsh: Extracted Bedroom Project
Lena Lapschina: Yes/No
Soup Kitchen 2014
Sofia Szamosi: Eat Me
Corina Reynolds: Northwestern Expansion
Emanuele Cacciatore: A Conversation with Consequence
Box Car Workshops and Derby 2014
Mark Stilwell: The Super Defense Force vs The Tittanno Beast (The Power of the Constructonauts)
Hubert Dobler: Roundabout
Arne Schreiber: Your Stripes
Katerina Marcelja: Fragment Series
Fuse-Works: Some Assembly Required
Anja Matthes: Out-Sight-In In-Sight-Out
Soup Kitchen 2013
Katarina Poliacikova: Until We Remember The Same